Fender Stratocaster explained and setup guide

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Go to menu top I never heard anything better than a Fender if we’re talking about the big manufacturers. Later on, in the Guitar section, I’ll also talk about Standel and EchoSonic , but they’re produced in such small numbers that it’s fair to say they’ll only have historic interest to the most of us So As long as you get a tube Fender you’ll probably be on the right track, because they all sound pretty good. It doesn’t have to be vintage at all, but they do look pretty cool. Actually I started out playing a vintage Vox AC 30 and it wasn’t bad at all. The sound was very ‘tube’ and that’s what you’re looking for, but Fender is still the better choice for Rockabilly. Fender Bassman ’59 reissue Many Rockabilly guitarists play a ’59 Fender Bassman or similar – vintage or reissue. It sounds perfect for rockabilly. The distortion which is where you get the right sound from changes dramatically with change of volume.

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Very nice semi-vintage Strat from the peak of the silver logo era. Some of you noted the E9 serial which frequently are ’89, but more often are ’90 or 91 like this one. Since the pots are dated ’91, it obviously couldn’t have left the factory two years before the pots were made so it’s obviously a ‘ Strats during this era are hit and miss.

Too many of them have bad necks with humps, twists, or max’d out truss rods.

Details about Fender Stratocaster USA. Fender Stratocaster USA | Add to watch list. Seller information. gto6. % Positive feedback. Save this Seller. See other items. Contact seller. This item will ship to United States, but the seller has not specified shipping options.

But, with more sales came more production, and more production meant less attention to details and a slumping of quality-control. They were getting more poorly-made instruments as the years went on and found they were still paying a high price for them. With the introduction of many other versions of the Strat and Tele, and other less-popular models, guitarists started looking for alternatives to Fender guitars. At this time in Japan, the electric guitar was making its great debut, and Fender guitars were highly sought-after.

Pickups were unwound and studied electronically, wood core samples were taken and exact dimensions of the woods were recorded. Artists were paid to replicate the logo designs and hardware designs. And then, finally, the Japanese started to manufacture their own Fender replicas under the names of such companies as Greco, Fernandes, ESP, Joo Dee, Westminster, Heerby, El Maya, and even Yamaha so that they could enjoy what America was enjoying, but under their own terms and at their own cost.

And most importantly, these guitars were easily available from local music shops. This went on for a number of years until it had become so popular that Fender was made aware of the situation and decided to really take a look at what was going on in Japan. After deliberately getting their hands on a few good copies, they were astonished and probably really angry about how accurate some of the copies were. Many ceased like El Maya, Heerby, and Joo Dee , but many desisted and kept making these same guitars with minor changes to the logos and headstock designs.

And there were others who just ceased, and then just picked up and started making them again under a different name. What a great idea!

The Fender Stratocaster: History, Models and Players

Lightly built with scalloped braces and hot hide glue construction, with a slightly deeper body for extra low end. This is from the new limited run of Brazilian R9s from Gibson. The guitar has a great top and weight – it only weighs 8. This impressive guitar incorporates modern enhancements like an ABR-1 bridge with titanium saddles, and a hand-wired MTC control assembly paired to our MHS P pickups with hum-canceling capabilities. This is from the new limited run of Brazilian R9s — and the lefties are even more rare, with only a handful made.

Fender Stratocaster guitars are perhaps the world’s most recognisable electric guitars. At Gear4music, we have a wide range of Standard and American Strats in stock as well as models from the Special, Deluxe and Roadworn series.

Serious electric guitar players and collectors clamored for reissues of the original instruments. But both manufacturers, at the time mere cogs in large corporate wheels, all but ignored them. Since being purchased by CBS in , Fender had radically modified the Stratocaster and Telecaster models on which its existence was essentially based. Numerous spin-off models of the Tele were created, though, some of which had the infamous three-bolt neck attachment.

Eric Clapton toured with Blackie, a mongrel built from a variety of Fender Strats. And pioneering Motown bassist James Jamerson continued to work in L. Tokai, in particular, produced extremely handsome clones. While far from perfect copies of the great sunburst Pauls of the late s, they at least replaced the then-standard three-piece tops of the newer Les Pauls with two-piece tops, with often stunning looking curly or flamed maple. Smith, Schultz, and Balmer consulted with some of the key employees of the pre-CBS Fender era, including designer Freddie Tavares, pickup winder Gail Paz, and final assembly inspector Gloria Fuentes, each of whom had over 20 years experience at Fender.

1971 Fender Stratocaster olympic white

About Guitars Buying a new guitar is a considerable investment for most of us. An instrument is all about inspiration. You are the musician and the guitar is the tool you use to express your feelings and music. This has nothing to do with what models you choose or how much they cost.

Born in a barn in , Leo Fender seems an unlikely father of rock ’n’ roll. But as the man whose company perfected the solid-body electric guitar, his contribution to contemporary music .

The progress of this type of work is slow, hence the long hiatus, however, a lot of new data have been collected regarding Fender amplifiers, including production numbers. Advances have been made with regards to the production of tolex amps and it appears that much of this information can be applied to late s tweed amps as well. In addition, the dating-by-serial number tables have been revised and are more accurate. The bad news is that there is still a lot of work that needs to be done on the silverface amps.

Unfortunately, there is some sad news to report as well. Fellow Fender amp researcher, Greg Huntington, passed away June 5, after losing his battle with cancer. Greg kept his illness very private, even from this author. His passing is a great loss to this research team and the Fender amp aficionado community in general. Greg was passionate about Fender amps and his knowledge, insight and humor will be missed very much.

Paul Linden has volunteered to fill in for Greg. Paul worked with Greg on their small box brown Twin myth busting research and is extremely knowledgeable about Fender amps in general with a specialization in the brown and blonde amps. Since , more interesting factoids of interest have surfaced and are presented here. Interest in vintage Fender amps really took hold about years ago. As a result, there are a lot of amps out there that may look original, but are not.

Pick a Model

Thus, for a given amp say, the 5E1 Tweed Champ they started with a definite number, in this case C , and just kept adding ‘1’ for each new Tweed Champ until the model was discontinued – in this case approximately C nine years later info from Greg Gagliano. So that’s about, oooh, let’s guess, 23, Tweed Champs. Some serial numbers were used more than once, on different amp types – example; A could be a Bandmaster, a Bassman, a Champ, a Concert, or a Deluxe info from Greg again.

Squier Strat vs Fender Strat – General Criteria Of course, the problem with trying to make any direct comparisons between the Squier and Fender is that there are over a dozen models, each with different pickups and their own individual features.

The original Fender American Standard introduced in and the later American Series guitars unveiled in were always about no-nonsense gigability. The new-for American Standards are no different. This isn’t an instrument to covet – it needs a stage. Here we have an alder body ash is only used on the sienna sunburst finish , and though any jointing is hidden by the opaque Olympic white polyurethane finish we’d guess, typically, Fender uses a three-piece spread. As ever, the contouring is not quite as sexy as the vintage reissue, or classic examples of the original, but it’s far from clunky and you’re reminded, especially in this finish, just how futuristic the guitar with all its contours and curves must have seemed some 54 years ago – not least when viewed alongside the rudimentary Telecaster shaping.

As with the American Series both rosewood and maple ‘boards are offered. The rosewood, of course, is a separate piece added to the maple neck; the maple option doesn’t have a separate fingerboard – the frets are installed into the front face of the thicker neck blank. One change here is that the fingerboard maple only is now gloss finished, as is the headstock face, though the neck back remains satin. It’s not going to please everyone; it feels and looks very new but, unlike the heavy finish on seventies-era Fenders, the finish looks thin and the big frets – approx 3mm wide by 1mm high – have more than enough girth for easy, slick playability.

Typically we have a modern ‘C’ profile approx Set-up – with the supplied 0. Subtle changes to the new series concern the finishing. The neck, for example, has a marginally deeper tint to the finish that looks less anaemic than the previous models, but less perma-tan looking than some lower-priced Fenders and numerous copies.

1950 Fender Broadcaster

Almost everybody is familiar with the look of the Fender Squier Stratocaster and it has been played by some of the best guitarist in the world. In my travels around the world I have seen strat look-a-likes in China, the Philippines and in Africa. The problem is that for most beginners, a Fender Squier Stratocaster costs a bit more than they are willing to pay.

A brief history. F or more than four decades, Fender electric guitars and amplifiers have had a tremendous influence on the way the world composes, plays and listens to music. While guitarists in the early part of this century played country, folk or blues on acoustic guitars, in the ‘s, jazz musicians experimented with amplifying traditional hollow-body guitars so they could play with.

Most notably, production dates have been penciled or stamped on the butt end of the heel of the neck of most guitars and basses, although there were periods when this was not consistently done to , for example or simply omitted. Neck-dating can be useful in determining the approximate age of a guitar, but it is certainly not definitive because the neck date simply refers to the date that the individual component was produced, rather than the complete instrument.

Given the modular nature of Fender production techniques, an individual neck may have been produced in a given year, then stored for a period of time before being paired with a body to create a complete guitar, perhaps, for example, in the following year. Therefore, while helpful in determining a range of production dates, a neck date is obviously not a precisely definitive reference. Most specifications for a given Fender instrument model change little if at all throughout the lifetime of the model.

While there have been periods of dramatic change—such as the transition periods between the Leo Fender years and the CBS years or the transition between the CBS years and the current ownership—most models are generally feature-specific and do not change from year to year. For years, serial numbers have been used in various locations on Fender instruments, such as the top of the neck plate, the front or back of the headstock and the back of the neck near the junction with the body.

Dating Your Instrument The chart below details Fender serial number schemes used from to Notice that there is quite a bit of overlap in numbers and years.

Fender standard maple Stratocaster (1989) USA

All had green ink. Yours has eight digits and is not “green”, so it is probably a or later. This new stamp was usually green ink. An example of this type of neck code is ” B”. So a neck could have either code system!

Note: Modifications to an existing Fender instrument currently under warranty, or service performed on a Fender instrument currently under warranty by any person other than authorized Fender service centers and technicians holding a certificate of warranty service authorization for the period during which the work was performed, will void the instrument warranty.

Don’t let anyone try to convince you that there is a Strat Plus, they just did not exist. It was owned by a former Fender employee who recently passed away. The strings, I am certain, were the original from 87, as they were rusty and hard to pull through the nut. I have owned ‘s of Strat Plus’, as well as helping s of people to identify their guitars. I also saw where Shell Pink was listed as an available color from Fender in color code 56 but not in any of the Strat Plus brochures.

This is the oldest Strat Plus I have come across yet, as it came off the assembly-line July 27th, ! Scroll up to see John’s Custom Shop work log. The backs of the pickups do not even have any stickers with the part or patent numbers. Instead they are hand scribed most likely done by Jeff Lace when in high school. The numbers on the pickups indicate the order which they were manufactured!

Fender American Standard Stratocaster Demo


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